Podcast recommendation

As we are gearing up for Holy Week and Easter, I wanted to recommend The Lanky Guys podcast, The Word on the Hill, particularly this week’s podcast on Palm Sunday.

The podcasts are focused on giving insights to the Sunday readings. Their description:

The Lanky Guys (Fr. Peter Mussett and Scott Powell) are two utterly brilliant and charmingly witty Catholic theologians who host the wildly popular podcast, The Word on the Hill, which attempts to tie together all of the readings from the Sunday Mass.

They generally run 45 minutes, so I start listening in small segments before Sunday. It really deepens my prayer having this food for thought on the readings.

Two thumbs up recommendation!

Four More Days….

…until Holy Week. I’m not ready, but then I never am. I look at where I have failed this Lent. I have been very weak. But, as my spiritual director reminds me, there is always room to begin again, and this last week can be marked with great intense work.

Still, I am the little child who climbs into Jesus’ lap. I tell Him how he knows how weak I am. I can’t do any of this on my own. I ask him to please carry me and walk me through all the hard things of my day.

I just wrote a long piece at Catholic Culture: Holy Week Preparation. It’s long. Did I mention it’s long? But it’s good for me to write it all out to understand why I’m always tired at Easter. It’s a lot. Even if I were to only do the Liturgical Preparation and attend the liturgies, I think we would still be tired.

This week I tested my oldest son on some of his allergens. He is allergic to eggs, wheat and dairy, with dairy being his worst. He is near the age where he should be starting to outgrow the allergens.

Report:

  • He tried bread that had eggs, and he had no reaction.
  • He tried two saltines and had a delayed reaction (itchy mouth).
  • We had pancakes that included eggs and no reaction.

He was disappointed the wheat didn’t work, but I was so proud of him because he didn’t throw a fit or cry, but very grown-up.

Our final test on the egg will be eating them straight. He’s eager to try.

He couldn’t stop talking about the pancakes. He was just thrilled. And I’m thrilled, too.

And why do I put this on a Holy Week post? Because I am hoping to find some recipes that are wheat and dairy free, but can use eggs. You don’t know hard it is to make baked goods without eggs. It’s just a crumbly mess.

I dislike testing recipes in Holy Week, but I think it’s the best way. If you have any suggestions for recipes, please let me know. I think in particular I’m looking for Hot Cross Buns. The recipe can have sugar, it can be with almond meal or other paleo flours or other flours, it also can contain oat flour. I can substitute milk with almond milk. Butter I usually substitute with coconut oil.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Holy Week and Easter

Palm Sunday is four days away. You could probably tell by my posts that I’m finalizing our plans for Holy Week and Easter. I have updated my top bar with Lent and Easter. Somehow all my Easter posts were missing.

I have also added a new category, Printables. I have not linked all my posts yet, but it might be helpful to have that category, and then subcategories depending on the liturgical season.

It is still a work in progress in updating my blog, but I have promised myself to not take on any new project until Holy Week is a distant memory.

Below is a compilation of my Holy Week and Easter related posts.

Various Posts for Reading, Planning, Triduum

EASTER

Easter Eggs

Easter Vigil

Prayers

Crafts

Recipes

Prayers and Hymns for the Easter Season is similar to my Lent for Children Daily Display, O Antiphon Prayer Companion, and Christmas Prayer Companion which incorporates our favorite liturgical tools, an easel binder (or this one which is more expensive, but more durable and expandable) which we use daily at the table to highlight different thoughts for the liturgical seasons or feasts. The Easter season “Daily Display” which has a page for the week with Sunday’s Gospel (this is Year A) and artwork and antiphon and prayers for the week. The antiphon can be used before any prayer of the day, and the family prayers can either be used for morning and/or evening prayers, or meal prayers. The section in parentheses is for meal times. The artwork is full-color art images.

PrayersEasterSeasonpreviewEaster Season Display Year A 2014

The second is a little booklet with black and white images, the prayers from the daily display, plus the Collect Prayers from the Sunday Masses, and also the lyrics to some key Easter hymns. This is paginated to print double-sided, and then fold and staple into a booklet. This is for everyone to be able to read along during family prayers. Print the first two pages on cardstock for a nice cover.

Easter Season Booklet Year A 2014

 

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Jonah and Holy Week (re-post)

One of the favorite activities we do at Holy Week is the Jonah Project. This is a repost which includes printable forms of the Jonah. My original post on this tradition is here: Lessons from Jonah.

A tradition in our house has become Lessons from Jonah during Holy Week, which was inspired by Mary Reed Newland from her The Year and Our Children. Her original instructions can be read online here and here.

Our materials were looking a bit shabby, and since they were originally crafted very hastily, I updated them this year. I loosely followed Mrs. Newland’s instructions to create Jonah, the fish (or whale), and a ship, but I’m not artist, so apologies if you cannot recognize these figures:

Now for something to do. This is an activity that sums up all that Jonas teaches. The children use it during Holy Week. You need 9″ X 12″ colored construction paper, scissors, paste, and your choice of crayons, paint, or inks, and glitter. If you get glitter, don’t forget a tube of glitter-glue to use with it. All these things can be found in the Five-and-Ten.

The fish, measuring 8″ X 5-1/2″, is cut from a folded piece of paper with the top of the head and tail on the fold. Paste the tails together and spread apart the base so that it will stand.

The ship is 6″ high and 6-1/2″ long, with the top of the sail on the fold. This is cut from one piece of folded paper. Cut another sail from another color and paste over the first; spread apart to stand.

Jonas is 3″ high with his hands on the fold. Paste his heads together and spread his legs apart.

Use different colors for each piece and decorate them to suit your fancy. On the sail of the ship we painted a single eye, a symbol of the watchfulness of God the Father, who saw Jonas run away and sent the storm at sea.

These .pdf files you can print on cardstock, color and cut, and fold to stand. From past experience, I recommend not cutting out the white space over Jonah’s head, or there will be trouble standing him up. There are two options for the fish. The larger one I use, tracing on a folded blue 12 x 12 paper from a local craft store — “Cardstock Stack”. But since not everyone has this lying around, I provided a smaller fish to print on 8 1/2 x 11 cardstock. I’m considering laminating or putting Contact paper at least on Jonah, as he gets the most wear. If you feel creative, add another sail to the ship. Frankly, I’d like to research what the ship would have looked like, because mine is not a convincing water-safe vessel.


Mrs. Newland continues:

This is how they are used. Pour yellow corn meal on a tray (if sand is not available), and the figures will stand up in it. At the beginning of Holy Week, Jonas is in the ship. Standing in the prow with his arms flung up like that, he looks as though he is about to be tossed overboard Good Friday he goes into the fish. On Easter Sunday, the first child awake runs downstairs to take him out of the fish and put him on the shore, where he stands with his arms upflung in a great and joyful Alleluia! On the mast of the ship he tapes a cross, because the ship is a symbol of Christ’s Church, born out of the graces of the Redemption, and the fish is an ancient symbol of Christ. Icthus is the Greek word meaning fish, and each letter is the initial Greek letter of each word in the Greek phrase Jesus Christ, Son of God, Saviour.

While the sand is a nuisance to clean, this is one week of the year I indulge in all the senses. Our base is a large wood tray with edges (the paintable kind from the craft stores), covered with aluminum foil (even the handles, so no sand comes leaking out). The shore and water lines are divided by a loose diagonal or straight line. The two different colored sands will go on either side. To keep the sands divided, I have used Sculpey clay, sometimes rocks on top of the clay or just rocks. The boys will touch it, and the colors will mix, but it’s a visual divider that we all like. (Note all these illustrations are from are old images, not the new ones above.)

We have reading to accompany our project:

Peter Spier’s Book of Jonah: My sons are immediately captivated by the story of Jonah, the odd names of Nineveh and Tarshish, and that wonderfully big fish. In discussing Jonah, I pointed out how he was in the fish for 3 days, just as Christ was in the tomb. And we put ashes on our forehead on Ash Wednesday to show repentance and change.

The Hard to Swallow Tale of Jonah and the Whale by Joyce Denham. Unfortunately, this book is no longer in print, but it’s worth tracking down a used copy or from your library.

While our copy of Spier’s book quotes directly from the Bible, some of it is a little lofty for a child. This book’s illustrations are fantastic, and the story, while not dumbed down, really reaches the heart of a child so he can understand how far-reaching is God’s compassion, and how Jonah was wrong to hide from God.

Don’t be fooled by the title to think the focus is merely on the whale part of the story, or a fictionalized or light-hearted approach. The book accurately retells the story of Jonah and Nineveh from start to finish.

And I found it wonderfully thrilling to see an illustration of the Jonah Project in another little booklet we read during Lent (Out-of-print, unfortunately), Spring and Lent by Rosemary Haughton.

While I usually put out Jonah on Palm Sunday, we’re a bit late this year…but he has time to sail on the boat before the fish swallows him.

May you have a blessed Triduum.

Quick Paschal Candle 2014

This is an update to last year’s Quick Paschal Candle design.

Make your own paschal candle for home. Use a simple tall white glass candle (available at most grocery stores) or a tall 3″ x 9″ pillar candle. Another possibility would be a tall (8″) beeswax candle in imitation of the beeswax candle used at church.

paschalcandleclip2014

Paschal Candle 2014

This is a .pdf version of the candle design. Print in color, and cut, leaving the amount you need to wrap around the candle. Either tape, or cover with Contact paper or clear tape or use ModgePodge over the image to apply to the candle, or print on sticker paper or decal adhesive film. Make sure to extinguish the candle when it gets close to the paper.

To the right and below are .jpg versions of the candle image. Click on it to view the full image and save to your computer. Adjust the printer to landscape and whatever size you need the image to print, since there are smaller and larger candles to cover.

paschalcandle2014

 

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I share my printables for free and I hope you enjoy them. A small donation of a few dollars can help me continue to create and share my work for free. Thank you for your generosity!

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Quick Paschal Candle 2013

This is an update to last year’s Quick Paschal Candle design. Also note you can find another beautiful version by Juan José, thanks to Evann at Homeschool Goodies, even more beautiful than mine.

paschalcandle2013 mini

PaschalCandle2013
This is a .pdf version of the candle design. Print in color, and cut, leaving the amount you need to wrap around the candle. Either tape, or cover with Contact paper or use ModgePodge over the image to apply to the candle. Make sure to extinguish the candle when it gets close to the paper.

Below is the .jpg file of the image below. Click on it to view the full image and save to your computer. Adjust the printer to landscape and whatever size you need the image to print, since there are smaller and larger candles to cover.

paschalcandle2013

 

 

 

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I share my printables for free and I hope you enjoy them. A small donation of a few dollars can help me continue to create and share my work for free. Thank you for your generosity!

Make a Donation Button
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Pysanky Progress

I woke up with orange and yellow stained hands. My boys have red and yellow and orange hands.

No, we have no disease. We are enjoying our Ukrainian egg work for Holy Week.

Yesterday we invited my sister and her family to join us in making pysanky. I had shared my beautiful local farm eggs. In addition, we now have some goose eggs which are a delight! I think I’m going to get some duck eggs to add to the assortment. The boys are enjoying the variety of eggs. We are enjoying a little nature rabbit trail reading Birds’ Eggs, comparing the variety.

When working with the younger children, there has to be some freedom to allow creativity and familiarity with the process and tools. We watch the Instructional Video to help them understand. The process is different than coloring eggs with food dyes. These dyes are permanent and put on in stages. To create an egg you think of the final product, then you have to think backwards. There is some trickiness which I have not mastered in the steps of the dyes and the interaction of colors. Green and blue are exceptions and will muddy the color so special steps are needed if this color is incorporated. And if the process is confusing to me and other adults, think how it is with the children!

My oldest son gets frustrated because he is a perfectionist. This is something to learn patience. I’m giving suggestions on trying to divide the egg (which I will help) and do small designs within the divisions. The Ukrainian designs are beautiful but difficult, especially with a child who doesn’t have good hand coordination.

When the boys are working I can’t really expect to get anything accomplished on my eggs. We’re working with open flames and permanent dyes. At times I get flustered with the “chaos”, so this is a good way to learn patience. After the boys are in bed, DH and I work on our eggs in quiet. It’s wonderful meditative work.

So without further ado, our current gallery (including my sister’s family’s eggs), including my first goose egg (lots of bad dyes and awful symmetry, but so much fun). The boys and I will work more after lunch.

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A Blessed Easter!!!


The Lord is risen, He is risen, indeed!

This is the day the Lord has made, Alleluia!
Let us rejoice and be glad, Alleluia!

We attended our parish Easter Vigil last night — 100 people came into the Church last night. The Mass was really beautiful and moving, so much so I was moved to tears of joy. After the Alleluia and Gospel, my oldest turned to me and said “Mom, I’m just so happy!” and gave me a huge hug. He expressed exactly what I was feeling!

I have updated the Prayers for the Easter Season to reflect the readings for this Year B. Not all images were updated, but a few. I also added the Collect prayers from Sunday to the Prayer booklet.

A reminder that the first file is similar to my Lent for Children Daily Display, O Antiphon Prayer Companion, and Christmas Prayer Companion which incorporates our favorite liturgical tools, an easel binder (or this one which is more expensive, but more durable and expandable) which we use daily at the table to highlight different thoughts for the liturgical seasons or feasts. The Easter season “Daily Display” which has a page for the week with Sunday’s Gospel (for Year B, 2012) and artwork and antiphon and prayers for the week. The antiphon can be used before any prayer of the day, and the family prayers can either be used for morning and/or evening prayers, or meal prayers. The section in parentheses is for meal times. The artwork is full-color art images.

Easter Season Prayers, Year B, 2012

The second is a little booklet with black and white images, the prayers from the daily display, plus the Collect Prayers from the Sunday Masses, and also the lyrics to some key Easter hymns. This is paginated to print double-sided, and then fold and staple into a booklet. This is for everyone to be able to read along during family prayers. The first two pages on cardstock for a nice cover.
Easter Season Booklet Year B 2012

And clipping from this post, a reminder of other Easter posts:

Easter — Eggs, Vigil, Crafts

Recipes

Thoughts for Good Friday: Children and Quiet

(I hit post too soon.)

I really enjoyed this post by Maryellen St. Cyr: A Time for Quiet. I think it’s a good reflection to read during the Triduum.

Her description of Good Friday in her home with her mother is exactly what we did in our family. The quiet was hard at times, but it stretched us.

But I also agree with her wholeheartedly on having quiet throughout the year, to include it in our areas of education. It seems this is an area of “Masterly Inactivity” and allowing the Holy Spirit to teach.

I personally do not like constant background noise. I like to shut off the radio and TV and just have family noise. One of my favorite sounds is hearing my boys playing happily together. One of my least favorite noises is when they are not playing happily together.

I do try to provide what we call “quiet time” during the day. We all retreat to our bedrooms, the older to read, and the younger to nap. I do my spiritual reading and prayer sometimes nap myself.

I haven’t been aware of quiet time through the rest of the day, but I see how it does fit in our day. My son builds Legos almost all the time, but usually in quiet. He’s pondering big creative thoughts.

During the warmer months we love to sit on our porch and eat our meals and enjoy the sounds of nature, which makes us naturally be more quiet. On nature study outings I do encourage more quiet to observe, to listen, and to enjoy. Sounds of voices and preoccupation with other things makes us lose the time of nature.

I will have to think more on ways to incorporate quiet during our days.

How do you incorporate quiet?

2012 Paschal Candle

2013: updated candle image here

This is an update to last year’s Quick Paschal Candle design. Also note you can find another beautiful version Juan José.
ETA: I didn’t realize the link doesn’t work, and I was unable to find the original. Do also visit Jessica at A Shower of Roses to see her beautiful paschal candle. I forgot about my beeswax sheets I bought years ago from Hearthsong. Another consideration….

Another ETA: Evann reposted the Paschal Candle by Juan José. So while the above link doesn’t work, this one does!

During my training for the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd I was taking notes on how they decorated their Paschal Candle. Since they have Liturgy of the Light every year and use the Paschal candle all year in the Baptism corner, the candle is used frequently. Usually the grains of incense look like red wax nail heads, but in this atrium someone made the nails out of red Sculpey clay. They styled the symbols on the candle with foil and red paper cut into the cross and the letters and numbers.

I really liked the other idea they used to keep a candle to last for a long time. They carved the top out of the candle to fit a votive light. The votive light can be lit and replaced, but the candle doesn’t burn.

Paschal Candle 2012 .pdf file
This is a .pdf version of the candle design. Print in color, and cut, leaving the amount you need to wrap around the candle. Either tape, or cover with Contact paper or use ModgePodge over the image to apply to the candle. Make sure to extinguish the candle when it gets close to the paper.

Below is the .jpg file of the image below. Click on it to view the full image and save to your computer. Adjust the printer to landscape and whatever size you need the image to print, since there are smaller and larger candles to cover.